Judgeing people based on their jobs

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ArucardsMaster

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In America people are judged for many things. Your weight, color, race, sex, sexuality, and even jobs. I realized it today that people are judged for everything even were you work and what you do.

People who work in the porn indestry for example, They must be seen a whor*s.
People who are lawyers are seen as Liers.
People who work in a resturant as dishwashers are thought of as Mexicans
Just to name a few

~Is it ok to judge people based on their jobs?

~Is it ok to judge people based on were they work?

~Is it ok to judge people based on what they do?

~Have you been judged?

In the name of God, impure souls of the living dead shall be banished into eternal damnation. Amen.
~Hellsing~

  • May 13, 2005

OceanAngel01

OceanAngel01

umi no tsubasa

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(By the way, I think you posted twice!) Anyways, I don't think you should be extremely judgemental. Being a girl, when you are alone and by the looks of the guy you think *scary*, just go with it, better safe than sorry. However, when it comes to jobs, each person is unique. Perhaps they really like their job and are good at it. Even if morally objectionable, it is their life. Good for them, whatever floats your boat. Anyway, see you around MT my friend! :)

Aa-chan

Aa-chan

AA-CHAN

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I think it's wrong, but I also think it's something that happens naturally if you don't know someone. It's happened to me once or twice when I stacked shelves at a local supermarket to earn some monies.

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Cadi

Cadi

True

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I think its wrong, I think its wrong to just judge people in gernal, but the fact is everyone of has had at least done it once... Everytime when people meet me in the frist time, they always are like... oh she is probably the smartest... but you know I'm deffintly not...

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  • May 13, 2005

Kitone

Following My Head

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Wrong, totally wrong to judge people like that. Job stereotypes are a very good way to get beat up at my school. Plus, such judging can lead to very awkward situations that may result in total embarassment

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...Worship the pocky

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  • May 13, 2005

RainOfStars

RainOfStars

Elusive Dream

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A person's job is part of who they are and what they achieved. If you are working at a part time job to earn some spare change when you are young, it is ok. But if they spend rest of their life in McDonald, I would say they are useless and doesn't deserve to live.

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EternalParadox

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EternalParadox

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Quote by RainOfStarsA person's job is part of who they are and what they achieved. If you
are working at a part time job to earn some spare change when you are
young, it is ok. But if they spend rest of their life in McDonald, I
would say they are useless and doesn't deserve to live.

The doesn't deserve to live part is I think a little too extreme. :)

But I agree with the general principle. If a person does not strive to better his own position and becomes complacent with mediocrity, then all the LESS power to them. But if a person tries really hard and is in a not-so-good job currently but works to climb the ladder, then good for him/her.

EternalParadox
Previously the Forum, Vector Art, and Policy Moderator

  • May 13, 2005

Kei-kun

Kei-kun

Loving Mizuho

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Now this is my area of expertise. I'm a psychologist, and this behavior is perfectly justifiable.
It's a natural heuristic that we humans use to solve and read our situations and objects.
This judgment is purely a short-cut to define attributes to items which hence reduce cognitive load in our minds. This indeed would seem wrong to the actual person, but it's really something that we all do.

Otherwise we would all be thinking of one person for hours on end trying to read precisely who or what they are.

Another prejudgment would be on psychologists. ^_^
They ask me what do I do? I say I'm a psychologist. They say: Oh! A mind-reader, go on please read my mind. :P Hahaha.

  • May 13, 2005

Minato

Minato

...scatter the dream...

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We don't always do what we want to do; life forces us down certain paths, and we have to cope with them.

ArucardsMaster

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Quote by RainOfStarsA person's job is part of who they are and what they achieved. If you are working at a part time job to earn some spare change when you are young, it is ok. But if they spend rest of their life in McDonald, I would say they are useless and doesn't deserve to live.

thanks

In the name of God, impure souls of the living dead shall be banished into eternal damnation. Amen.
~Hellsing~

  • May 14, 2005
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This thread is reminding me of American Beauty. I try not to apply my paradigm of 'success' to other people. Sometimes we bemoan that others do not achieve their potential, but if we factor in the effort they're willing to exert rather than their ability alone, then it's possible that a lot of seemingly downtrodden people are reaching their potential.

I guess it depends on whether or not you think of a persons upbringing and environment as a part of their being. That probably seems a bit abstract - but think of the many people who do not put themselves where they need to be even if they know better.

Sometimes people with very simple jobs are actually very happy with their lives. A friend of mine has a Bachelors yet packed everything up one day and moved to the other side of the country. I hear he's working the floor in a little music store and is very happy. Judge that? Heck, I envy that, no matter how many times more money I make than him, he is very wealthy in spirit.

Of course, how do you feel when you see one of those bums at a highway off-ramp, begging for booze money? I've known enough rags to riches people that I can't feel sorry for them anymore. You don't want to judge them, but there's a fine line sometimes between being open-minded and being naive.

Of course, this is all in the context of a developed, first-world country of opportunity.

  • May 14, 2005

ArucardsMaster

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Amen^

In the name of God, impure souls of the living dead shall be banished into eternal damnation. Amen.
~Hellsing~

  • May 14, 2005

Terra-chan

Terra-chan

Crazy Lazy Workaholic

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Quote by Kei-kunNow this is my area of expertise. I'm a psychologist, and this behavior
is perfectly justifiable.
It's a natural heuristic that we humans use to solve and read our
situations and objects.
This judgment is purely a short-cut to define attributes to items which
hence reduce cognitive load in our minds. This indeed would seem wrong
to the actual person, but it's really something that we all do.
Otherwise we would all be thinking of one person for hours on end
trying to read precisely who or what they are.
Another prejudgment would be on psychologists. ^_^
They ask me what do I do? I say I'm a psychologist. They say: Oh! A
mind-reader, go on please read my mind. :P Hahaha.


XD Haha that takes me back to my psych classes ahhh, I loved learning about heuristics...

Anyway, yes, it is completely natural to do these shortcuts and judge people and things by the little that we know about them. I do it all the time. I know it's wrong to hold an opinion of someone completely by a thought process comparing a person to a set idea in your head though so I just use it as a guideline to try and help me get to know a person.

And frankly... on the matter of people doing part-time work all there lives being useless and not deserving to live that is completely uncalled for. I'm an intelligent individual and I'm going to university, but I really don't have much drive to do something overly constructive with my life and would be perfectly content to be a housewife. Would that make me less of a person than people who do part-time work? What if those people who do part time work really would like to do something else for their lives, but are stuck in these dead-end jobs because they're paying off student loans and are doing their best just to get by and can't get into the work they're trained to do? What if they're a person that likes to experience all sorts of part-time work and purposely go from job to job looking for new experiences?

Everyone has their reasons for being where they are and I'd never look down on someone who is content with doing dishes, or working at McDonalds because there are things that need to be done. Would you look down on the person that collects the trash? Ok, go ahead. No think of what would happen if there was no one to collect trash, most people would just keep piling it up waitiing for it to be picked up, but it never happens, what then? What if you're hungry and go to a fast food place, but it's closed because no one would work there because it's a dead-end job and they don't want to be caught in a cycle?

Saying that people who are content to do menial labor are useless and don't deserve to live is way off. In fact, you'd be more useless for considering it because everyone needs the little guy at some time. Every job has it's merit. Don't dis them.

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ArucardsMaster

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Very true Terra chan couldn't have said it better my self, plus who asked the judges in the first place. Sometimes people don't like their job but they feel comfortable in it and don't like change. Is that wrong?

In the name of God, impure souls of the living dead shall be banished into eternal damnation. Amen.
~Hellsing~

  • May 14, 2005

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