Modern Socialism

page 1 of 1 6 total items

xday

xday

Anime Revolutionist

Cancel

Communism is old now and many countries have given up the idea of communism. Most of them now allow free enterprises and ownership to come. From the past to the present we have seen the communist experiment as a failure. However what about socialism? We still have socialism that allows us to have wealfare and pensions, but there are still a lot of homeless in the United States. Has socialism dwindled in the present century or is it still alive? If so what forms of modern socialism are there?

As Karl Marx had said in the last sentence of the "Communist Manifesto,"
"Anime fans around the world unite!"
Create a revolution for anime.

  • Sep 18, 2005

jasaiyajin

jasaiyajin

-repeat-

Cancel

I don't think the people here at Mt understand what the terms mean well, can you elaborate, people here are lazy. ^_^

-repeat-

  • Sep 19, 2005
Cancel

I would have to say that communism is not a failed state - It depends on the strength of the countries resources wheather it be people or natural resources and their ability to require or use these resources. That countries true influnce on a global scale can still have great impact to make it a succussful communist goverment . As for your question at hand - I think it requires a more ture explanation as to what socialism actually is. Socialism is an ideology with the core belief that a society should exist in which popular collectives control the means of power, and therefore the means of production. In application, however, the de facto meaning of socialism has changed with time. Although it is a politically loaded term, it remains strongly related to the establishment of an organized working class, created through either revolution or social evolution, with the purpose of building a classless society. It has also, increasingly, become concentrated on social reforms within >modern democracies<. This concept and the term Socialist also refer to a group of ideologies, an economic system, or a state that exists or has existed.

In Marxist theory, it also refers to the society that would succeed capitalism, and in some cases develop further into communism. Marxism and communism are both very specific branches of socialism. The two do not represent socialism as a whole.

In modern socialist theory, it is in the pursuit of the goal of creating a democratic society that would form the backbone of an ideal welfare state.

I'm hoping that this explnation will help in other people to understand the basis of your question - In ture theory no form of goverment has been able to control it's welfare state or homeless problems - Lets face it if any countries form of goverment could solve these problems alot of other goverment would follow suit - It is not a matter of placing more dollars into the system - we know this does not work yet this what is done time after time. It is more of a social belief or the ability to belive in a system that would make it work. Unfotunatly you know this will never happen. The rich want to stay rich - and the poor fight to makes ends meet. I belive socialism on its modern beliefs still exist , but do to socities belief that it will not work, it is still not working.

" And the peasants rejoiced "

  • Sep 19, 2005
Cancel

The main problem with Communism and Socialism, in any real form, is human nature. People are naturally greedy, and that tends to upset a socialist society.

  • Sep 19, 2005

aemil

aemil

Mega-newb

Cancel

No offense, but you aren't throwing us a homework question or something? Maybe you'd like to elaborate on your position and the questions you pose, eh?

  • Sep 19, 2005
Cancel

Socialism still exsists in some form in Britain. I think its called the welfarestate or something but its modified so that it does not take away personal responsbilities.

  • Sep 19, 2005

page 1 of 1 6 total items

Back to General Discussions | Active Threads | Forum Index

Only members can post replies, please register.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Read more.