||Biology Help , Onegai^.^||

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Hi, i am currently having Biology Grade 11 in nightschool. Yes i know, terrible isnt it?

Well, i've never taken biology before in my life, so im kind of confused on some parts. I was wondering if anyone could help me explain these following questions and tell me how they got the answer.


-Why do some people add salt to a steak only after it has been cooked?

-Chemical fertilizers are composed of salts that dissolve into soil moisture and then are absorbed by the root cells of a plant. Why should you never overfertilize a plant?

(I know this has something to do with osmosis and diffusion, but thats the only clue the teacher gave me. I was wondering if anyone could point out to me basically how they got the answer to this and how the process goes)

I appreciate any help^.^

Thank you very much.

Asigha

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hmm now what did my mother and I tell you it's cause you'll spoil the meat cause salt will diffuse too quickly with the meat and thus the meat spoils && that's why ppl merinate the emat before they cook it. :D
Smart Moment provided by the one&&only Asigha ^_^' lmao

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Quote by Asighahmm now what did my mother and I tell you it's cause you'll spoil the meat cause salt will diffuse too quickly with the meat and thus the meat spoils && that's why ppl merinate the emat before they cook it. :D
Smart Moment provided by the one&&only Asigha ^_^' lmao

Ash, i doubt it has anything to do with spoiling the meat. XD

Asigha

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Quote by toxictea23

Quote by Asighahmm now what did my mother and I tell you it's cause you'll spoil the meat cause salt will diffuse too quickly with the meat and thus the meat spoils && that's why ppl merinate the emat before they cook it. :D
Smart Moment provided by the one&&only Asigha ^_^' lmao

Ash, i doubt it has anything to do with spoiling the meat. XD

pssh fine ~_~
but if it has to do something with spoiling the meat I swear I'm going to say "I told you soooo!" :D

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HB13

HB13

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Quote by toxictea23
-Chemical fertilizers are composed of salts that dissolve into soil moisture and then are absorbed by the root cells of a plant. Why should you never overfertilize a plant?

(I know this has something to do with osmosis and diffusion, but thats the only clue the teacher gave me. I was wondering if anyone could point out to me basically how they got the answer to this and how the process goes)

First know the definition of diffusion and the differences between the 2 (diffusion = movement of ANY molecule to establish some balance; Osmosis = WATER diffusion across a semi-permeable membrane due to differences in solue concentration). Which side will the water go to? (Hypertonic = side with the most solutes, Hypotonic = side with the least solutes)

When you over-fertilize a plant you're putting a lot of excess solutes (soluble stuff) outside of the roots in the soil. If the soil is hypertonic to the root cells (have more solutes/fertilizer than the roots has solutes/ions/organelles/what other cell stuff), then the water will tend to travel outside to the soil. Thus very little water is entering the root cell and going to the plant & the plant gets dehydrated (wilts and then dies). Think of it like yourself eating a bunch of salt - you're going to need a lot of water to help restablize your solute concentrations or you will die (really you will from excess salt).

Quote by toxictea23-Why do some people add salt to a steak only after it has been cooked?

Only explanation I can say is that if you add salt onto the steak during the cooking process, the side with the greater solute concentration will be outside of the steak. Then osmotic action will come in and squeeze the fluids outside (all the tasty steak juices will flow out) and spill out onto the coals of your grill. Only other times whenever you do add salt "en masse" for grill cooking is when you wrap the food in tin foil. There's also the "salt-crust" dishes where you literally cover meats (fish, hams, etc.) in a salt/spice cover.
Ex: Salt-Crust Salmon

This just normal HS biology, or is this AP Biology (or the Canadian equivalent of college-level basic Biology)? I miss those days four years ago, so easy back then OX

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  • Feb 23, 2006
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well prehaps, in answer to your first question:

Salt affects absorption of water. Maybe that if salt is added whilst cooking the meat will tend to dry up, leaving it not to taste that nice - I mean really who likes eating dry meat XP

And for your second, too much salt will dehydrate the plant, hence causing it to die.

Very very basic answer there - but now that I look about (don't know how I missed that before ^_^') you have a very nicely detailed answer.

Good luck with your homework!

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SekiRyuu

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wow. . . we never went over that stuff in biology. . . we just went through the photosenthesis, DNA, and microbe junk

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to simplify hb13's answer. basically water will go to where the salt is through the semi-permeable membrane of a cell because during osmosis water likes to go where the higher concentration is. in a hypotonic solution the solute concentration in the environment around the cell is lower than in the cell. so the water would go in the cell. in a hypertonic solution the solute concentration in the environment around the cell is higher than in the cell. so the water would go out of the cell. the water just likes to go where the "crowd is going"^^
wow i learned this stuff in october or something. good luck with your homework!

  • Feb 23, 2006

PAche

PAche

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-Why do some people add salt to a steak only after it has been cooked?

so that the salt is more of an addition rather than an ingrediant?i dont knwo its just a guess

-Chemical fertilizers are composed of salts that dissolve into soil moisture and then are absorbed by the root cells of a plant. Why should you never overfertilize a plant?
i'm sure of this.overfertilisation has several effects.some plants have small pores in their roots, the fertiliser molecules will block those pores so inhibit their water absorbtion.second effect is it makes the soil have lesser water potential than the plant sap.since the plant depends alot on osmosis to gain its water, the water from the plant would go into the soil rather than come from the soil into the plant.

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I have to concur with HB13 and HB13's answer is very concise and detailed. (perfect for answering the question with.)

HB13

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Quote by Asighahmm now what did my mother and I tell you it's cause you'll spoil the meat cause salt will diffuse too quickly with the meat and thus the meat spoils && that's why ppl merinate the emat before they cook it. :D
Smart Moment provided by the one&&only Asigha ^_^' lmao

Salting techniques (similar to pickling) is mainly used for preservation. Mainly to get all the fluid out of the meat (Pickling will also create an acidic environment) so as not to create a good environment for bacteria to grow on (usually a warm, and moist area = good bacteria/fungus growing zone).

Only way you can "spoil" meat with salt is if you salt it to preserve it against normal bacteria then throw it into some tide pools (where salt-resistant bacteria grow).

"The Way of the Warrior is death. This means choosing death whenever there is a choice between live and death. It means nothing more than this. It means to see things through, being resolved."
-Yamamoto Tsunenori, Ha Gakure (Hidden Leaves)

  • Feb 23, 2006

ShrinkNerv4Eva

ShrinkNerv4Eva

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Because of a cell wall, bacteria require being turgid, or plump, with water. When you add salt to steak, the salt would pull water out of any bacteria present, thereby killing the bacteria and not allowing any other bacteria to exist in/on the meat.

The overfertilizing has nothing to do with the plants being fertilized. The excess fertilizer would not get absorbed by the plants. Actually, it would get added to runnoff water and eventually end up in lakes and streams, causing lots of algea to grow. This excess algae grows and dies rapidly, depleting the water of oxygen, killing off the micro-ecosystem of the lake/stream. It also blocks sunlight so other plants cannot grow in the lake/stream. Also, it's a waste of fertilizer, which is a waste of money ^_^

Hope I could help.

  • Feb 23, 2006
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I've had a similar homework last year, in my Biology class. If I remember right, the salt draws out the water from the meat. If you add it before or during cooking, the meat will become dry.

I think it's that simple.

Sorry, I don't know the answer to the second one...

How I got the answer? As I've said, we were given a similar homework, last year in my biology class, in 8th grade (i think, because we have a different system here, 8th grade is actually 2nd year high school here, -sigh-).

  • Feb 23, 2006

tanteikun

tanteikun

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I think the first question, you can ask your mother or father (whoever cooks) for help

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Shinjutsu wa Itsumo Hitotsu

  • Feb 24, 2006

echidnaboy726

echidnaboy726

Good eye, sniper

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Mmm.... steak.

  • Apr 09, 2006

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