Converting MP3 Back To Wave Question

Which format you recommended to use

MP3
4 votes
Ogg Vorbis
1 votes
Wave
0 votes
Wma
0 votes
AAC
2 votes
MP3PRO
0 votes

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I know when a wav file is encoded into mp3 format, you're compressing it and leaving out parts that are non-essential and so you end up with smaller size with similar quality. So what if I decode that mp3 back to a wav file? Is this now exactly how it was before I converted it? If it is exactly the same, I'm having a hard time understanding where that extra info was that whole time?

The reason I'm asking is because I have some mp3s I wanna burn to cd, and I know wav is higher quality, but then I started wondering if I would end up losing more information since I would be converting that mp3 back to wav? If the files are equal, where was that extra size hiding? In other words if I convert a 5mb mp3 back to wave, where did that extra 30 something mb come from?


Steel is my body and fire is my blood. So as I pray... Unlimited Blade Works.

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When a wave file is converted to mp3 format, the pure original
quality of the song it lost forever.
The reason why most people don't hear those changes is because they
operate at a fequencey where the human ear can't detect and thinks
it's playing at the same quallity.

If you burn it from MP3 to wave you probably won't
get your quality back.


This is why lossless codec are getting popular
since MP3 players these days have gigantic size
storage.


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  • Jul 11, 2006
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The data that stores the sound in frequencies that are generally outside of human hearing, or on the fringes of it, are the first to be eliminated when compressing files into lossy audio formats. When you convert to a lossless format you aren't getting that data back, but creating new data that estimates what the missing data should be. You won't notice any increase in audio quality doing this, and it's generally stupid to convert any lossy format back into lossless except for the purpose of feeding it to another program that won't accept the original format.

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MP3 is the worst lossless codec due to its age, and pretty much any of the others are better, MP3PRO is for streaming only IIRC and is not supported well, Ogg while good also lacks support in mainstream electronics.

  • Jul 11, 2006
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Quote by TSPhoenixMP3 is the worst lossless codec due to its age, and pretty much any of the others are better, MP3PRO is for streaming only IIRC and is not supported well, Ogg while good also lacks support in mainstream electronics.

Which is all well and good, except for the fact MP3 is a lossy format.

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Thanks very much for the replies. Just wanted to ask one more question. Say an MP3 is 128k bitrate. If i were to convert it to 256k or 320k. Will there be any noticeable difference regarding in sound quality or introduction of artifacts?

Steel is my body and fire is my blood. So as I pray... Unlimited Blade Works.

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Quote by OnimusaruThanks very much for the replies. Just wanted to ask one more question. Say an MP3 is 128k bitrate. If i were to convert it to 256k or 320k. Will there be any noticeable difference regarding in sound quality or introduction of artifacts?

There was a experiment on in a tech mag article about this
and it's really difficult to notice the difference, but if you
hear that song in its original form (from the orignal CD) a lot then you might
notice a diffrence in the difference in bitrates.

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  • Jul 11, 2006
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Quote by OnimusaruThanks very much for the replies. Just wanted to ask one more question. Say an MP3 is 128k bitrate. If i were to convert it to 256k or 320k. Will there be any noticeable difference regarding in sound quality or introduction of artifacts?

no you wont notice any difference but a rule of thumb in encoding is whenever you encode something you lose quality, for more info you can visit this hope this helps you ^_^ site

Celessa

Retired Moderator

Celessa

Okaerinasai - Welcome Home

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Preferably, because my iPod Video runs over on AAC format, I do prefer AAC over MP3 at certain times. Even though I may not be an expert on OGG itself, the only reason why I still use MP3 [majority of 320 kbps] over the other formats is because it is apparently the most supported format for most media players out there, so there's not much I can do to get around it even if I tried. However, just recently since around the early March of 2006, I was able to get my hands on a superb encoder from a music program I bought while venturing a supermarket store by Sendai that lets me convert my original CDs to true Free Lossless Audio Codec [FLAC] type files, best converted in Compression Level 7 or 8 at times. It is the true form of Lossy formats [it is claimed that virtually no sound quality is lost whatsoever when compressed], and while I prefer lossless the most, it takes up a whole lot of space, which was something I was unable to take into consideration when I had the Nano iPod back then. With my new [company suggested, modified] 5th Generation iPod in place, I can finally listen to the Lossless I want for once. **Snickers**

"No matter where you go, no matter how tough life may be, just remember that always in your heart, you will still be loved."

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Quote by denmark42983

Quote by OnimusaruThanks very much for the replies. Just wanted to ask one more question. Say an MP3 is 128k bitrate. If i were to convert it to 256k or 320k. Will there be any noticeable difference regarding in sound quality or introduction of artifacts?

no you wont notice any difference but a rule of thumb in encoding is whenever you encode something you lose quality, for more info you can visit this hope this helps you ^_^ site


Cheers, Thanks very much for the link. I've learn quiet a lot from the site.

Steel is my body and fire is my blood. So as I pray... Unlimited Blade Works.

DarkChronos

DarkChronos

The Wicked One This Way Comes

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I use M4A (Mpeg4 Audio) and at 128Kbps sounds AWESOME :D

  • Jul 16, 2006
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One thing people tend to forget when testing bitrates is to use quality speakers, many people who don't notice the difference between lossless and 128kbps can't do so because of the quality of the speakers/headphones.

Just keep that in mind, for example 320kbps MP3 is pointless if using cheap speakers.

  • Jul 23, 2006

melikecookies

melikecookies

cookie monster

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My preferred format is OGG Vorbis because it can get a higher bitrate than MP3, but most of my music is in MP3 because my MP3 player doesn't support Vorbis ;_;

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  • Aug 02, 2006
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Relax , buddy . If you want to burn a CD , just use nero , it can burn mp3 into a CD . You can use Foobar to do this job too . Just install the CD burn plug-in of foobar , and then , make a playlist that contain the files you want to burn , select them all , right click , you can see the burn command .
Also , you can use K3B to do this job . K3B is a part of KDE which is a linux desktop environment , you can find it in many linux distribtion .

  • Oct 19, 2006

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