Oxford Univ., studies in English countries, life in U.S.

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Willem

Willem

Keltosh's padawan

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Hi all.

I would like, i would REALLY like the most opinions, points of view, ideas, personal thoughts about this subject. The more people will share their opinions, the more complete and vaste this subject will be. So please, just take a moment to answer this subject. It may interest others once this experience will come.

So, what will we be discussing?

First, about " studies ", about studies in a foreign country, in english countries more exactly and how it is considered over the world (like in your country).
Then, about " living " in U.S.

I'm french, still living in France but not for long as I'm about to go to Oxford. This huge university is said to have a high reputation over the world. But there's a reason why i'm going this far from where i ever lived: i want to obtain a well-considered diploma to be able to work around the world especially in United States. But the fact is that i don't know really how are and how work these things.

So, how is considered a diploma from Oxford University (England) over the world? in U.S.? How can it help? How in your country could it be helpful?

And with such a diploma, will I be able to work in U.S? How is the " real " life in U.S? How can we (as strangers) settle/live in U.S? I would really like comments, opinions about U.S. and how is the life in U.S. from americans living in their country. And informations for incoming european people too.

Thanks everyone.

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Real life in the U.S.? An interesting question.

Firstly, there is no normal pattern to life in the U.S. Each of our fifty states has its own unique qualities, sub-cultures, and cuisines.

An Oxford degree will look impressive on a resume in ANY nation, or so I would assume. However, your field of study is what is of greatest importance to any potential employer.

You ask how "strangers" can settle and live in the U.S.

Your most important thing to remember is that U.S. citizens are as diverse and broad in their opinion as you can get. We have people on the extreme left and right here.

The best rule for adapting is that age old axiom, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do."

  • Jul 18, 2006

Mnemeth

Mnemeth

Rider of the Currents

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I have to agree with bweb. It really does depend on what you are studying. Oxford is a great school for certain subjects and if you intend to make a career out of those subjects then Oxford is probably a good choice. However I would look around a make sure that Oxford is the school to go to for what you want to study.

As far as living in the US is concerned, keep and open mind and learn the language (and I don't mean just British English although thats a good start but keep in mind that American English is alot less structured). Just like any other place in the world each area of the US is very diverse and attitudes can change from one city/town to the next (in big cities this can sometimes occur within a city block) and that change can be very significant in certain areas.

Do not interfere in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.

  • Jul 19, 2006

Willem

Willem

Keltosh's padawan

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Thanks for these replies.

About the kind of degree i'm applying in Oxford: it's called " Master in Computer Science ". In other words, i should be as an engineer in computer science able to work in network administration, database administration, language programmation, distributed systems, and all of that kind of " jobs ".

There's quite a paradox in that point as i want to work in US but don't even know how is the job-market [regarding computer siences] (i mean the possibility to find a job) nor how i could find it.

About the language (american english like you said Mnemeth), i generally use more the american than the english but anyway i'll keep this advice in mind, thanks! Have an idea about where i could see/learn that kind of language differences?

Could it be possible to have some more detailed exemples about " each area of the US is very diverse and attitudes can change from one city/town to the next (in big cities this can sometimes occur within a city block) and that change can be very significant in certain areas. " ?

I may have a " stupid " question but i'd like to ask it anyway: it is said (in France) that americans don't like french people. Is that true?

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Mnemeth

Mnemeth

Rider of the Currents

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As to your question on if Americans like French people, it depends on the particular American. One (of of several) overall views is that the French are arrogant and unfriendly torwards Americans. This is borne out by experiences of a few that are transmitted to many. Personally I think that few were arrogant enough to think that other countries should speak english instead of trying to learn the language of the country they were visiting (I guess arrogance is one of those world wide things). Personally I had no problems when I visited Paris and with a few exceptions found most French people to be very polite and respectful (of course I did try to speak the language when I could).

Do not interfere in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.

  • Jul 19, 2006

Willem

Willem

Keltosh's padawan

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That's really kind of you Mnemeth ^^ I was fearing that all Americans were thinking like that. Because like you said, not all of " us " are arrogant.

Oh by the way, is there some things that i should know or learn before coming in US? I mean, like bweb said: "When in Rome, do as the Romans do." but anyway, it may be nice to be already aware of those things that are important to know, to learn for people about to live or starting to live in US. You talked about the language, i got it. Is there something else? What is common, is used to be in US (that may not be the same over the world)?

And... what did you do, did you have to do, when you start living on your own in US? :)

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