Help! Help! Help!!!!!

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Aerith0530

Aerith0530

~ I s r a f e l ~

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Ok, starting about last week, everytime I try to save an image, the image would be saved as a BMP file. I mean, my computer has the ability to open the saved pic and then switched the format and then save again, but that's just a pain in the neck! It is just my computer? Is there some setting I need to change? It's happening in MT and other wesites as well! It's driving me nuts! And I can only remember maybe once or twice where I can save as a JPEG file........why!!?!? XO

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nuniko

Bionic Teapot

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Try going to Internet Options and clear your cookies. That usually works for me. I'm not sure if you're supposed to clear your temporary internet files too, though...

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Canvas ::: W.C.C. ::: Anime Club :::

  • Sep 11, 2004
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maybe u should have u'r com checked... or maybe leave that as a last resort
i don't know much about how coms work
but maybe its just a glich in the web, i don't know
:\ now that u think about it, i think its better to have u'r computer checked for any bugs :\

jadenite

Kawaii Girl

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Clear your cache, and history. Clear your cookies also if you remember all your passwords for the various sites you visit.

Good, Bad, I'm the guy with the gun. - Ash, Army of Darkness

Groups: Ecchi Club, Onetea

  • Sep 11, 2004

Yoh

Yoh

Yoh The Great!

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Yeah! Go to Internet Properties-> General -> Temporary Internet Files -> Delete Files. That will solve the problem. :)

Earn money reading e-mails here

Myke

Myke

Upstract

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Other solution - switch to firefox and forget about IE as your mainbrowser.
(I guess you mean saving images from the web!?)

Ninja

Ninja

Slacking Ninja

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It also might be spyware problems you. You should run a spyware cleaner program lik Ad-Aware.

arkive

arkive

drifto touge all day...

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no..it's not those things it's hoe the pic is down loaded if u got it from the web it's prob... a jpeg..u can change the format when u save it but it will be a jpeg pic anyway and have the little pixels...but u can change the format when u save it in the dropdown after u hit save to comp...

  • Sep 11, 2004

arkive

arkive

drifto touge all day...

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no..it's not those things it's hoe the pic is down loaded if u got it from the web it's prob... a jpeg..u can change the format when u save it but it will be a jpeg pic anyway and have the little pixels...but u can change the format when u save it in the dropdown after u hit save to comp...u know...the little box that comes up and asks u it u want to open or save?...hit save then befor u hit ok choose the format in the drop down there's a lot
so choose the one u want...

  • Sep 11, 2004

macguges

macguges

yet another otaku geek

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As Arkive said, the problem lies with the web browser storing images in a different format than in which they were originally transmitted to the computer. Without intending any offense, most of the suggestions made were simply wrong.

Specifically, clearing cookies, the temporary internet files or cache, or the history would have no effect on this problem. Spyware certainly does suck, and you should certainly uninstall any mysterious programs from your own pc that you don't remember installing, but it is exceedingly improbable that any spyware would change the format of saved images

This problem occured in the human-computer interface. The unfortunate truth is that programmers often create confusing & idiosyncratic interfaces for their programs, and users must acquire confusing & idiosyncratic knowledge of these interfaces in order to translate their intentions into computer actions. This process is similar to Trinity asking, "Tank, I need a pilot program for a b-212 helicopter," but more cumbersome. Aerith0530 did a smart thing by asking for help, because the solution is education.

First I will explain what happens when you view a webpage, for example http://www.minitokyo.net/

Your client program (say Internet Explorer) breaks this web location into a method (http), a web server name (www.minitokyo.net) and a webpage (the slash /, also called "root").

IE uses the method HTTP to talk to www.minitokyo.net about viewing the root webpage.

www.minitokyo.net replies, "Here's some html." You can see what the web server sent by choosing 'page source' from your web client.

IE reads the html, and sends www.minitokyo.net a list of additional requests. Many of these will be requests for image files.

www.minitokyo.net transfers these image files to IE, which stores them in its cache (also called "temporary internet files"). These image files in the cache will be identical to the image files stored on www.minitokyo.net.

After IE has collected all the extra stuff asked for within the html, IE puts this stuff together for you to see (imagine IE as a cook working from a recipe, or a construction manager working from architect's blueprints).

There's a lot of different tasks IE has to perform, so we'll jump to the one we need to learn about, displaying an image. The web browser cannot display an image to you by itself. Programmers and electrical engineers have assigned that responsibility to the graphics card, and the operating system (such as Microsoft Windows). The web browser must ask the operating system to display its image, and the operating system in turn will give the image to the graphics card.

(Many years ago, image viewing programs would talk to the graphics card directly, but programmers have done away with such intimacy in these days of glory & progress. The old way was confusing, complicated and distracting ... for them. Don't you feel better?)

Before IE can give an image to the operating system for display, it must convert it. The image came delivered in the form of a very long sequence of numbers (the file), organized in a specific way that programmers understand called the image format. Web images arrive in many formats, but the operating system will accept only one format - the bitmap. So IE converts the image it received from www.minitokyo.net (using special instructions written by a programmer who understands JPeG, GIF, PNG, TIFF .. can you believe it? Yeah right, he probably snarfed it from a "Graphics Formats" book on his shelf) into bitmap form.

IE then passes the bitmap image to the operating system, and moves on to whatever other tasks it must complete to show the whole root page it got from www.minitokyo.net.

Good for you, if you've read all this way. You should have an idea where these BMP images come from on Aerith0530's computer. These bitmaps (BMP is short for bitmap) are leftover materials from IE's work displaying web pages.

Normally these leftover materials would be discarded, but somebody among the programmers had an idea. This idea appealed to the programmers, but adding the idea to IE caused its interface to become more complicated. When the interface changed, it differed from Aerith0530's knowledge of it, and confusion was born.

This insidious idea, as Arkive explained, was to allow the user to save the image in different image formats. "Let the user do more with Internet Explorer, the greatest web browser in the world!" Fools! The user expects the web browser to display websites (and may know that the browser collects images from web sites, which can be diverted to other uses). But the user does not usually think of what the browser does after it gets a web page. "It gets them, then it shows them."

The user does not expect the web browser to convert images between graphics formats, which is the veritable branch in Aerith0530's path which caused her to trip and fall on her face (again and again and again, from the sound of things, and it's a damn good thing this is a metaphor or we'd be taking her to the infirmary next). This is why this problem is a human-computer interface problem, and not the result of a bug or malicious spyware.

So Aerith0530 should do as Arkive described and carefully select which format into which she wants to save her images. Since I'm not using Microsoft Windows nor Internet Explorer at the moment, I cannot provide explicit directions.

Somebody may wonder why I needed to write this very long explanation after Arkive had already correctly pointed out the problem & its solution. My reason is that I object to the rudimentary instructions that are almost always provided to computer newbies, leaving them at the mercy of their teachers and cybernetic tormentors. If we provide only the practice without the theory, they will never develop the skills to overthrow the Evil Conspiracy of Mad Programmers to Enslave Innocent Users!!!!!

Users unite! You have nothing to lose but your naivete!

All statements are true in some sense, false in some sense, meaningless in some sense, true and false in some sense, true and meaningless in some sense, false and meaningless in some sense, and true and false and meaningless in some sense. A public service clarification by the Sri Syadasti School of Spiritual Wisdom.

TwilightNoir06

Tsukihime

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Aerith, hopefully this will help because I use it on my own images. There is a free program that you can download called IrFanView. You still have to convert from bmp to jpeg, but it's really quick, like a few seconds!! I use it all the time. It's quick and easy and oh so painless! Hope this helps!

One must either be a work of art or wear a work of art.

  • Sep 12, 2004
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It usually happens when a damaged program is downloaded to the "SystemRoot\Downloaded Program Files" folder. Just clear the Temporary Internet Files folder and also delete any file that is listed as Damged or Unknown in the "Downloaded Program Files" folder. If you would like more info, here's a link to an MS kb article.
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=810978

  • Sep 12, 2004

macguges

macguges

yet another otaku geek

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Well, that is bizarre. I've read Microsoft's Support Page, so I must concede that's another possible solution, but it annoys me to no end that Microsoft doesn't provide any explanation with the solutions they provide. How downloaded applets or ActiveX controls could affect saving an image, on which we need no processing, makes little sense to me.

But it doesn't surprise me - I've seen enough programming errors in Microsoft products to expect such lazy overconfidence.

All statements are true in some sense, false in some sense, meaningless in some sense, true and false in some sense, true and meaningless in some sense, false and meaningless in some sense, and true and false and meaningless in some sense. A public service clarification by the Sri Syadasti School of Spiritual Wisdom.

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