Software for overclocking pc?

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Hi,

I like to ask if anyone here knows of a good software that can be used to overclock a pc?

Steel is my body and fire is my blood. So as I pray... Unlimited Blade Works.

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It depends on the type of motherboard you have.
High-End motherboards like the ones from Asus, Gigabyte, and DFI have their
own special utitlties which lets you overclock your components.

What motherboard do you have?
Brand name and model number?

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  • Sep 27, 2006
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Thanks very much for the reply. My motherboard is a k8n-e deluxe. I manage to overclock my 3500+ 64 from 2.4 to 2.85ghz yesterday. :D

Steel is my body and fire is my blood. So as I pray... Unlimited Blade Works.

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Run it and see if it's stable enough. Most of the time if you overclock a processor
you will need a better 3rd party cooler because stock HSF aren't for overclocking.

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  • Sep 28, 2006

Zangetsu-ssl

Zangetsu-ssl

Soul Slayer

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Overclocking your CPU is not as easy as you think. There a series of factors which you have to consider:

1. Temperature
CPU's have a certain temperature range which they can operate in, which is usually between 10c and 80c. Overclocking usually means that you're making the transistors flip back and fourth thus increasing the heat output. The temperature output is usually directly proportional to the frequency you overclock your CPU to. To manage the temperatures you can either get a more efficient CPU cooler... which either can be an efficient heatsink/fan combo, water cooler or need be... an evaporation cooler. Your stock cooler will just not handle the extra heat.

2. Core Voltage
As stated above, overclocking involves the transistors flipping back and fourth. Energy (electricity) is required to achieve this, thus if you overclock your CPU by a huge length from it's stock speeds make sure you increase the core voltage. Do these in increments of 0.1V until you get a stable CPU. Note also that increasing the core voltage will increase the heat output.

3. Front Side Bus (FSB) and FSB Multiplier
The front side bus governs the rate at which data flows in and out of your CPU onto the motherboard. However, in BIOS it will display a different FSB to the one stated on the CPU since it's the FSB divided by the number of pipelines. Generally it is the FSB which you increase the frequency of the CPU.

The FSB multiplier is what determines the actual speed of the CPU. Thus the CPU's speed is the FSB, that's divided by the number of pipelines, multiplied by the FSB multiplier. Therefore if I have a Pentium 4 3.0GHz CPU with 800fsb then the pipeline FSB is 200MHz (since it has 4 pipelines) and it's multiplied by 15. More often than not the FSB multiplier is locked, however if it's not locked then use the FSB multiplier to increase the frequency of the CPU.

4. AGP/PCI Frequency
When the FSB get's changed so does the AGP/PCI frequency. Normally the frequency is at 66MHz/33MHz (AGP/PCI). Most new motherboards will allow this setting to be locked in. However, if the motherboard does not allow this to be locked in then choose the frequency that's the closest to the normal ones.

5. RAM (Random Access Memory)
For a stable overclock you'll need to loosen the timings of the RAM. This will allow enough headroom so that the RAM can keep up with the demand of the CPU. The frequency may also be changed if you feel that the RAM is restricting the overclocking of the CPU. How you'll know? Well, when you hit a brick wall for the overclock of your CPU... try changing the settings of the RAM. If you can overclock further than the RAM was restricting the CPU.

As for your question 'What's a good software for overclocking PC?'. None if you're going to overclock the CPU. Generally most of the well known manufactures (ABIT, ASUS, Gigabyte, Foxconn, MSI) will include programs that will allow overclocking the CPU whilst in Windows. However, I find these programs are a POS (look it up yourself) and doesn't factor in most of the stuff I stated above. If you just want a low - moderate overclock then by all means use it... since I think most have a button that says 'Find stable overclock'. But if you want the highest possible overclock then use the good ol' BIOS.

As for overclocking the graphics card. I recommend Coolbits for nVIDIA based graphics cards. This is a registry edit that allows the frequency of the GPU (graphics processing unit) and the VRAM (video random accessing memory) to be changed. For ATi I reckn' ATi Tool will suffice.

For RAM... it's not that hard really. Just change the timings so that they are a little faster and the frequency (if needed). Also increase the voltage slightly (and I mean in small increments of 0.1V or less).

The key to overclocking is to test each setting you change throughly and look for any signs of unstablity like graphical glitches, crashes and/or random freezings. I suggest you get programs such as PCMark, 3DMark, Memtest and CPU Burn-in to test the components you overclock.

One last thing. Most people generally neglect the fact that the Northbridge will increase in temperature when you overclock the CPU and RAM. Therefore if you plan on heavy overclocking... use a 3rd part Northbridge cooler... and if necessary a Southbridge cooler (if you're pedantic enough ^_^' ).

I hope that helps. :D

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  • Sep 28, 2006
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Yup i ran very intensive benchmarks and the whole way through everything appears to be stable. My CPU temperature when idle is on 33c going up to 38c when fully load. After locking the AGP/PCI like you said. I'm have been able to get my cpu to a further 2.92ghz. Voltage for the core, i up it from 1.5v to 1.7. So far so good. Thanks very much for the info guys.

Steel is my body and fire is my blood. So as I pray... Unlimited Blade Works.

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If you can't overclock your computer from the bios, then you shouldn't be overclocking it at all, and the benefits are almost negligible at best (unless of course you take the extreme route, but liquid nitrogen is not very cost effective for long term use). It's also no fun at all unless you do it yourself in the bios (or even better with jumpers on the motherboard if your computer is ancient).

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PC is for use , not for overclock . But if you do want to overclock , use BIOS , it's the best overclock tool .

  • Oct 19, 2006

Zangetsu-ssl

Zangetsu-ssl

Soul Slayer

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Quote by tandkzyPC is for use , not for overclock.

Wrong. Sure some people use the PC for work, study and entertainment. The point of overclocking is to sequeeze the last bit of juice out of your PC (ironically it actually shortens it's life span) so that it is actually usable with the new programs which are CPU intensive. However, there are some who just like to tinker with the PC and see how far they can overclock their PC before it turns in to critical meltdown. It is seen as a test of skill... ~_~

Some people may say that your cup may be half-full, some may say that it is half-empty. But I say, are you gonna drink it or not?
PCPP Forum - Internode GN Forum - GameArena Forum - StaticSub Forum - OCAU Forum - Atomic v2.5 Forum - DS Australia Forum - Whirlpool Forum - MiniTokyo Forum - Madman Entertainment Forum - Clan TeamqQp - AsiaGroove - Bleach7

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  • Oct 23, 2006
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The most important thing when overclocking is heat. If its too hot, TURN IT OFF.

  • Oct 28, 2006

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