Life in Mars?

Mars Colonization Posssible?

Sure can!
6 votes
Possible, in the near future.(within 100 years)
5 votes
Possible, but in far future.
7 votes
Impossible.
2 votes
Not sure.
0 votes
I don't care.
2 votes

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ttwen

ttwen

somebody

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Alright, I'm just curious about how many are skeptical about colonizing Mars. Recent Phoenix Mars Mission find that the soil on Mars contains highly oxidizing substance perclorate, which is not suitable for life. But it does not necessary means life is completely impossible, and plus, the presence of water is confirmed, giving some hope of colonization.

For those who are interested,
Link: NASA Mars Exploration Website
Link: Phoenix Mars Mission Website (NASA)

Personally, I think it is possible but a lot of terraforming is required. Therefore I don't think it's possible to colonize Mars in near future.

Edit: I made a grammatical mistake, should be "Life on Mars", I hope theres no misunderstanding due to the title. :sweat:

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It's not impossible, but we certainly couldnt live on the surface of mars without some sort of protection. Mars doesnt have a magnetosphere, and would be constantly bombarded with solar winds. This would also strip the the planet of it atmosphere through erosion with the radiation stealing all the ionized particles. So trying to restablish the atmosphere wouldnt do much good. It may not be impossible, but I'm not seeing a lot of possibilities. I cant see there being any life of Mars's serface, but if there were an underground lake perhaps. To be honest, I think theres more possibility of there being life on Titan, Saturn's moon.

  • Aug 14, 2008

maverickmechanic

maverickmechanic

Absurd Insanity

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Couldn't have said it better, Marfish. Besides, terraforming would take at least a century. Life may have existed on Mars at one point in time, but the cooling of the planets core and subsequent loss of the Magnetic field, I don't think there will be anything to find.

I'm not sure about Titan though. Granted, there are organic compounds similar to what we find on Earth, but I feel it is just too cold for life to form. I mean, lakes of liquid Methane. I could foresee using Titan as a fueling station though. And Mars has Iron of course. I think that exploration and gaining knowledge will be a factor, but for any real progress of space colonization, profit will have to be made somewhere, and mining operations would probably be the first to pop up.

The best place I can think to look for life is one of the Jovian Moons, Europa. There is already a project being researched and built to explore the ocean of water under the ice layer.

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  • Aug 14, 2008

Schlander

Schlander

The StealthHawk

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Grant if there is enough building resources, and abundant amount of water, such available resources can aid in the construction after initial colonization and nourishment of the human population, since transporting large volumes of water and materials would be prohibitally expenses.

Life is just the act of progressing, if you don't advance you don't live.

  • Aug 14, 2008

ttwen

ttwen

somebody

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marfish: i don't think theres anything can be done with the atmosphere either, Mars had a much weaker gravity after all, which is another reason why it can't hold an atmosphere like Earth's. i agree with you that if Mars is to be colonized, it has either to be over a protective cover or underground. but for life to thrive, i think it's better to have the soil altered to suit plants/microbes from Earth, thus requiring extensive terraforming.

maverickmechanic: Europa would be another difficult place to colonize. the main thing would be its lack of Nitrogen, which is important for plants and microbes to survive. as i believe the way to solve food problems is to have producing food independently on the colony itself, plants and microbes would play an important role.

Schlander: in fact, water is quite abundant in our solar system and can be extracted.

in my opinion although i do see more potential in Titan than of Mars, the colonization pioneer would still be Mars. Mars is very much closer to earth compared to Saturn, or even Jupiter.

bloodD

bloodD

The Darkness King

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There is life in Mars and proof trust me.

  • Aug 16, 2008

shoujoboy

shoujoboy

Launching shoujoboy 2.0

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Can humans colonize Mars? I think that's almost a given. But the biggest determining factor is whether or not we NEED to. Humans have the amazing ability to adapt to changes in their environment when their hand is forced. As long as colonization remains somewhat of a game, or a what if, we will have problems doing it. As long as the thought of other planets being colonized is simply a matter of "wouldn't that be awesome" instead of "the fate of humanity depends on it", it will be a slow and arduous process that might not come to fruition until the latter is the case.

Under construction. Who doesn't like plain text anyway?

  • Aug 16, 2008

Alfredigital

Alfredigital

I WAS BORN TO MURDER THE WORLD!

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maybe...

http://pcmedia.gamespy.com/pc/image/doom31a_1091862243.jpg

beyondmeasure

From the mind comes the query.

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Quote by shoujoboyCan humans colonize Mars? I think that's almost a given. But the biggest determining factor is whether or not we NEED to. Humans have the amazing ability to adapt to changes in their environment when their hand is forced. As long as colonization remains somewhat of a game, or a what if, we will have problems doing it. As long as the thought of other planets being colonized is simply a matter of "wouldn't that be awesome" instead of "the fate of humanity depends on it", it will be a slow and arduous process that might not come to fruition until the latter is the case.

Interesting way to put it. So the deepest reason for us to not colonize Mars is a reluctance, or, if not that, a lack of motivation?

  • Sep 24, 2008
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I'll say it very possible and not only for Mars. as long as they can somehow sustain a stable environment and also many essential substances also present in Mars already eg water.

If there is more efficient ways for space travel then the development will be way faster.

  • Oct 15, 2008

Ekitna

Ekitna

Ima Survivor!

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Mn, could it be, but first we must create an atmosfere to breathe. The planet is rich on Fe (perfect to spinach), and the water is ice there... so i think we can have littles farms, The place is perfect to construction, but not nothing permanent

  • Oct 15, 2008

Lacuslover81

Lacuslover81

One big and true lover of Lacus

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I feel it is possible but so far I jsut don't see much proof other than some water.

A true lover of Lacus Member of Kira-and-Lacus-in-Love

chirido

chirido

Chiri-san

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Not sure, the life is depend on many elements

Whatever will be...

  • Nov 07, 2008

Nubes

Nubes

Blah blah blah!!!

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Well, I think with all the advances of science that the world have had and the projections of future, I think colonization of others planets is possible, Mars being the closest to earth and the one who scientist has demonstrate more affection for.

I hope new discoveries approach us to a nearest life in Mars, not so so far in the future, becuz the situation here on earth is pretty pretty bad.

P.S.
Some pple have done their homework... very pretty and amazing comments here! :)

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its possible with the advancement of science

make use of what you have currently.. focus on the present with the past to guide you and the future to look forward to..

  • Nov 11, 2008

LVman

Awesome

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life cant be impossible even on mars.theyve actualy found micro organisms in the soil.
theres no litter ether.they've even found ice.Thats water!

  • Jan 15, 2009

Suxinn

Suxinn

Greatest of all Clocks

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Of course it's possible. It's not a question of "can", it's more a question of "when". With how technology is proceeding nowadays, we might be able to see at least one attempt of this within our (or, at least, my) lifetime.

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Recently I have heard of methane being detected with concentrations large enough to peak scientist interest.

"Okay they found methane. Why might that seem important?", one might ask. Methane is the by-product of living things. Some 90% of the methane in Earth's atmosphere is produced by living things. Thus the detection of significant quantities of Methane on Mars leads many scientist to hypothesize there may be lifeforms active on that planet even under the harsh conditions of Mars.

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  • Jan 21, 2009
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Life in mars ?
hmmmm

possibly

  • Feb 24, 2009

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