laptop: is dual core worth it? + CS and CS2 scores

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Hello all!

Today computing are mainly categoriezed into to sections:
desktop and mobile. The desktop users will always get to use the latest technologies
first, and brag about how powerful their systems are, such as dual graphic card displays (better yet quad graphics display),
Godzilla size harddrives, and they don't have to worry all too much about cooling since
they can always add more fans, use water cooling, or even phase change cooling
Better yet, they can even change the case or upgrade parts.
On the other hand there are the mobility users, upgrading is very limited. The mobility user are always a few technologies behind the desktop
user, such as they won't have the newest technology the desktop user already have, until a few years later on.
Now a new technology the desktop user had for so long, has finally come to the mobile platform.
It's called the dual core processor (or called dual core cpu). The cpu make look just like any other cpu you see out there
but on the inside it packs a totally different type of architecture. Instead of one brain, it's actually got two.
In the a mobile platform will a dual core cpu hands down be better than a single core cpu and is it even worth
spending the extra $300 to $500 just to get one? Also will the mobile user get to enjoy their computing experience as much as a desktop user? Let's find out. :)

Now let's take a deeper look as to what is a dual core processor?

A dual core processor is actually two process in one die.
When a desktop user who has a dual core system, it lets them
run multiple applications efficiently and also reduce the amount of time it takes
to complete the task. This make the desktop user extremely happy!


Now it's the mobile users turn to take a chance and see if they will get the most
of their dual core laptops. By the way as some of you may be reading this, you must
be wondering what is the diffrence between a desktop dual core processor and a
mobile dual core processor? Well there are some diffrences and this is what they are.
A desktop dual core processor use a different type of socket layout called LGA775 also
known as SocketT. It uses a 90nm process (for the 800 series) and a 65nm process (for the 900 series).
Each has it's own 1mb of L2 cache.

As for the mobile dual core cpu it uses socket479 similar to it's
predecessor the Intel Pentium M which also uses socket 479, but the pin layout has changed in
a mobile dual core so therefore the Intel Pentium M and the mobile dual core will not be compatible with each other.
In other words, you can not get a dual core cpu and install it on your Pentium M laptop. The dual core cpu will not fit.
It is also built on the newer 65nm process, includes 2mb of "smart" L2 cache, XD disable bit*, and Vanderpool Technology+ also
known as VT technology+.

*XD disable bit is available on all dual core cpus
+Vanderpool Technology (VT technology) is only available on the 900 Intel Pentium D and the mobile dual core cpus.
Intel Pentium D 800 series does not support Vanderpool Technology (VT technology).
What make the mobile dual core special from its desktop dual core is its 2mb of "smart" L2 cache.
In a desktop dual core there is also 2mb of L2 cache, but each core gets 1mb and they do not like to share it with each other.
In a mobile dual core, each core also gets 1mb, but it's shared among both cores.
When executing a application when the working core needs the extra help by
taking the cache from the idle core and improves performance.


AMD will eventually implement VT into their own processors it's
code name is called "Pacifica"

Systems used in benchmarks.

System#1 (desktop)
Intel Celeron D 3GHz
1GB DDR400 ram (2x512mb) with dual channel mode
80gb harddrive
Intel 915g
Windows XP Professional with SP2

System#2 (desktop)
Intel Pentium D 2.8GHz
1GB DDR2 667MHz ram (2x512mb) with dual channel mode
80gb harddrive
Intel 945p
Windows XP Professional with SP2

System#3 (laptop)
Intel Core Duo 1.8GHz
1GB DDR2 533MHz ram (2x512mb) with dual channel mode
80gb harddrive
Intel 945gm
Windows XP Professional with SP2


The first system is use to show a general perspective
to see how a single core processor performs.

The image test is from
driverhaven.net
You may download it here
image test suite download


The test consists of 12 filter test.
All systems were set to the requirements according to the site.
All systems were forced to finish its idle process.
All systems had their startup programs shutdown as well as disconnected
from the Internet.

Now for the benchmark results.
The dual core processors have their 2nd core turned off
The Intel Pentium D's 2nd core is was disabled by using the
switch command inside Boot.ini

http://img112.imageshack.us/img112/1954/singlenomucs4ka.jpg
The single core Celeron D has a higher frequency therefore it's able to
compete with the single core Intel Pentium D. Right here it seems the Intel Core Duo is not performing to well

http://img119.imageshack.us/img119/695/singlenomucs28cs.jpg
Same here also.

The multitasking test had the following applications running in the background.
Compressing a 846mb file using WinZip set to maximum compression
Converting two video clips (total size of 362mb) into High Definition Divx format
This setup is repeated during each test.

http://img47.imageshack.us/img47/5380/singlemucs0ll.jpg
Right here we see the Intel Core Duo gaining some performance, and it's pretty close to the Intel Pentium D. Even though the Intel Celeron D has a higher clock speed, somehow it can't handle multitasking too well.

http://img363.imageshack.us/img363/9118/singlemucs27yd.jpg
The Intel Core Duo takes the crown in this category

Now for the dual core benchmarks
The 2nd core is enabled
The first system has been elminated because it does not have a 2nd core.

The multitasking test had the following applications running in the background.
Compressing a 846mb file using WinZip set to maximum compression
Converting two video clips (total size of 362mb) into High Definition Divx format
This setup is repeated during each test.


http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/8923/dualnomucs9en.jpg
The Intel Core Duo come pretty close to its desktop processor.

http://img46.imageshack.us/img46/2411/dualnomucs25ri.jpg
The benchmark speaks for itself

http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/9113/dualmucs9nu.jpg
The Intel Core Duo performs a really good score here.

http://img220.imageshack.us/img220/639/dualmucs25xr.jpg
Right here, the Intel Core Duo shines. It manages to beat the desktop processor.
Even though it has a lower clock speed.

As you can see in the benchmarks. The Intel Core Duo does perform really well thoughout the whole test. And it even beats the desktop, when multitasking. If you are planning to get a new laptop, a dual core processor will be the right choice.

If you are planning to get a desktop, getting a system with a dual core processor is also a right decision.

A single core laptop starts around aprox $850 (but it's not Pentium M or AMD Turion 64)
A dual core laptop starts around aprox $1600
Apple's Mac Book Pro (dual core) starts aprox at $1999

Thank you all in advance for taking your time to read it.

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  • Apr 08, 2006
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Intels mobile processors astound me at how well they can perform compared to their desktop relations. It makes me wonder why Intel can't make their desktop processors work more each clock cycle in their desktop lines. Out of curiousity, what are the FSB and cpu voltage at during these tests on the Core Duo?

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Quote by jonsey32Intels mobile processors astound me at how well they can perform compared to their desktop relations. It makes me wonder why Intel can't make their desktop processors work more each clock cycle in their desktop lines. Out of curiousity, what are the FSB and cpu voltage at during these tests on the Core Duo?

The mobile processor has a 667MHz FSB as compare to 800MHz FSB on the desktop.
As for the temp, I've not test that out, and to redo it just to read the temps is a
PITA.
But I'll count that in during the next set of tests. :)


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  • Apr 09, 2006
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And the voltage?

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Quote by jonsey32And the voltage?

Ohh, voltage!

the desktop is v1.400
the notebook is v1.404

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  • Apr 10, 2006
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I cna't wait to get my hands on one and overclock its guts out :D

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Quote by jonsey32I cna't wait to get my hands on one and overclock its guts out :D

You really can't overclock notebook processors since most
BIOS are limited as to what you can do especially over clocking
Unless you are able to find a desktop motherboard that uses supports
the Intel Core Duo socket.

Wait! I think I just did!

mobile on desktop

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  • Apr 20, 2006
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Quote by tiki223

Quote by jonsey32I cna't wait to get my hands on one and overclock its guts out :D

Unless you are able to find a desktop motherboard that uses supports
the Intel Core Duo socket.

Sadly, that is always the hard part.

Radeonator

not here, not now.

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let's wait for Intel VIIV conroe with DDR3 and CSI, the data transfer rate will be better between both core since there will be onboard memory controller in it's processors "die" like AMD's K8 architecture.

This Core "YONAH" duo is really trouble doing multi-tasking job, there are few people in my country complain about the performance, but i think it was getting a little better after the "sonomah" core released.

edited: there's nothing wrong with celeron D, i think...

=Im here temporarily, please dont visit or leave any message.

DarkChronos

DarkChronos

The Wicked One This Way Comes

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for the Intel Fans, wait until Conroe ;)

  • Apr 28, 2006
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Intel VIIV (prounced veev) is not a processor but
a technology that contains a few components combined to
be called "Intel VIIV".

Similar to Centrino Duo you need the require components
to be called Centrino Duo.

Conroe should be out soon probably in 2H'06
link

For a preview on it take a look here
link

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  • Apr 28, 2006

somebodyelse

Retired Moderator

somebodyelse

Pacman's mouthpiece

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^^ It'll be interesting to see how mobile dual-core stacks up with AMD's stuff in Photoshop CS in your tests. I read Maximum PC and PC World and a couple online tech sites, and from what I understand, AMD's procs usually take Intel's lunch money at Photoshop apps.

Just wondering, tiki223, do you read/work for any tech magazines? You're pretty thorough with your benchmarks; I'm impressed.

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Quote by somebodyelse^^ It'll be interesting to see how mobile dual-core stacks up with AMD's stuff in Photoshop CS in your tests. I read Maximum PC and PC World and a couple online tech sites, and from what I understand, AMD's procs usually take Intel's lunch money at Photoshop apps.

Just wondering, tiki223, do you read/work for any tech magazines? You're pretty thorough with your benchmarks; I'm impressed.

As of now there are no mobile dual cores from AMD, but if there is I wonder how well it will perform
against its competitor.

The AMD X2 as of now is dominating over Intel, but let's see what happens when their new
architectures starts to arrive and that shall be soon real soon.

Nope I don't read or work for any tech magazines, this is just one of my hobbies. :)

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  • Apr 30, 2006

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