K-pop's rising edge

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kokuyu

kokuyu

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K-pop, a.k.a Korean pop songs, seems to be getting popular as well, quite comparable to J-pop. Don't you think both pop sounds similar in tune? If otherwise, what is their dinstinctive style? ( I used to get confused with two of these types, until I was able to grasp its pronounciation & intonation differences) :o ^_^'

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Celessa

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Celessa

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K-Pop is somewhat similar to J-Pop, and take it from a person who knows too much about the whole Japanese Mainstream / Bubblegum Pop Genre in general. However, from a further expressive perspective of mine, when you have undergone a lot of experience understanding the language inside out like I have, the distinctive style then becomes actually quite clear when you look at the whole entire picture in general.

K-Pop normally attributes to a strong orthodoxal style.

You can possibly argue with much agreement and say that K-Pop, unlike most of its J-Pop counterparts, fits well into an orthodox-like music style. K-Pop facilitates well in its culture, but most artists are well noted for their revolutionary music, their ballads in particular, and classicals as a whole. What most Korean artists are also often noted for are their roles of singing love songs, songs about life, and often stories between other people.

J-Pop is very diverse in many different ways.

Unlike K-Pop, J-Pop branches well off the mainstream agenda, and you will noticeably catch on artists that not only use imagery to sell their works, but rather their unique style of lyrics and several "nasally attributed" singers in the works, especially that of the female solos department.

Japan also has been essentially able to adapt and conform to the idea of having the public listen to sweeter music closer to that of the Bubblegum Pop genre, which is quite popularized these modern days [unlike many of the other countries]. Some would take Morning Musume as a greater example of why these things actually work out, funnily enough.

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Then again, the media is often well supported, songwriters apparently earn more for what they have actually hoped to bargain for, and with the constant successes of high tech games that still sell big here and overseas from the Tokyo capital itself, music [mostly of the J-Pop genre] is often complimented well not only because of the booming sales, but in a bigger part of the daily life of these citizens, along the way.

Is K-Pop on a rising edge?

Contrary to that belief, K-Pop has never been as high on the popularity stage as that of J-Pop here in the Asia-Pacific, and I'll be happy to explain the main fundamental why:

+ Japanese sales outmatch Korean sales in the music category.

As you may or may not realize it, more and more Korean artists are sliding into the J-Pop industry, but why the sudden switch? It's because several also wish to find booming success elsewhere rather than their very own country, their names to be heard around the world, and one area that has often been on that prosperity scale is none other than Japan. However, because Korean-singing artists are often led elsewhere and dragged from out of the spotlight too many times to recall [aside from those who know singers like K, mink, or BoA for example], its been rather difficult for these vocalists to earn the recognition that they deserve. Different nations have often been the separation between "the bad" and "the good" in a sense. It's sad but true.

The main reason why K-Pop seems to stand out on its own.

Recent surveys from the Asia-Pacific Media Network [which I just latest reviewed not too long ago after looking up the whole Misono concert listings - yay!] has many critics who have noted that Korean male artists are slowly but surely rising up the charts. This can be long contributed to the worldwide success of the quality and power of such voices.

I'll admit it as well. In my very own opinion, Korean male artists still do fair better than the Japanese male artists in their department. [However, I cannot say the same for the female artists, that's for sure.] It's because of their strong notion and support to stick by their orthodoxal roots that makes the genre still stick out as it apparently does today.

When speaking in a popularity sense, Oricon often notes a top singer by sales of volume in Japan depending on how well known the singer is, how well publicized it is sung over by the radio, multiple star previews on shows, and the works. Not always will the top sales be based on how well talented vocally the artist is in person.

To conclude this whole scenario, I still love my J-Pop to an entirety, hands down. I've listened to it all the time even when I was a very little girl. I somewhat like K-Pop too as well, though that of a far less degree. If only some people would listen to music other than the ones often heard in the radio stations or in videos or in games, they wouldn't really be missing out on what several overlooked, but extremely talented artists would be sending out today. It's just a shame how these artists who spill their love for music never get the true recognition they so humbly and righteously deserve.

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Quote by CelessaK-Pop is somewhat similar to J-Pop, and take it from a person who knows too much about the whole Japanese Mainstream / Bubblegum Pop Genre in general. However, from a further expressive perspective of mine, when you have undergone a lot of experience understanding the language inside out like I have, the distinctive style then becomes actually quite clear when you look at the whole entire picture in general.

K-Pop normally attributes to a strong orthodoxal style.

You can possibly argue with much agreement and say that K-Pop, unlike most of its J-Pop counterparts, fits well into an orthodox-like music style. K-Pop facilitates well in its culture, but most artists are well noted for their revolutionary music, their ballads in particular, and classicals as a whole. What most Korean artists are also often noted for are their roles of singing love songs, songs about life, and often stories between other people.

J-Pop is very diverse in many different ways.

Unlike K-Pop, J-Pop branches well off the mainstream agenda, and you will noticeably catch on artists that not only use imagery to sell their works, but rather their unique style of lyrics and several "nasally attributed" singers in the works, especially that of the female solos department.

Japan also has been essentially able to adapt and conform to the idea of having the public listen to sweeter music closer to that of the Bubblegum Pop genre, which is quite popularized these modern days [unlike many of the other countries]. Some would take Morning Musume as a greater example of why these things actually work out, funnily enough.

Then again, the media is often well supported, songwriters apparently earn more for what they have actually hoped to bargain for, and with the constant successes of high tech games that still sell big here and overseas from the Tokyo capital itself, music [mostly of the J-Pop genre] is often complimented well not only because of the booming sales, but in a bigger part of the daily life of these citizens, along the way.

Is K-Pop on a rising edge?

Contrary to that belief, K-Pop has never been as high on the popularity stage as that of J-Pop here in the Asia-Pacific, and I'll be happy to explain the main fundamental why:

+ Japanese sales outmatch Korean sales in the music category.

As you may or may not realize it, more and more Korean artists are sliding into the J-Pop industry, but why the sudden switch? It's because several also wish to find booming success elsewhere rather than their very own country, their names to be heard around the world, and one area that has often been on that prosperity scale is none other than Japan. However, because Korean-singing artists are often led elsewhere and dragged from out of the spotlight too many times to recall [aside from those who know singers like K, mink, or BoA for example], its been rather difficult for these vocalists to earn the recognition that they deserve. Different nations have often been the separation between "the bad" and "the good" in a sense. It's sad but true.

The main reason why K-Pop seems to stand out on its own.

Recent surveys from the Asia-Pacific Media Network [which I just latest reviewed not too long ago after looking up the whole Misono concert listings - yay!] has many critics who have noted that Korean male artists are slowly but surely rising up the charts. This can be long contributed to the worldwide success of the quality and power of such voices.

I'll admit it as well. In my very own opinion, Korean male artists still do fair better than the Japanese male artists in their department. [However, I cannot say the same for the female artists, that's for sure.] It's because of their strong notion and support to stick by their orthodoxal roots that makes the genre still stick out as it apparently does today.

When speaking in a popularity sense, Oricon often notes a top singer by sales of volume in Japan depending on how well known the singer is, how well publicized it is sung over by the radio, multiple star previews on shows, and the works. Not always will the top sales be based on how well talented vocally the artist is in person.

To conclude this whole scenario, I still love my J-Pop to an entirety, hands down. I've listened to it all the time even when I was a very little girl. I somewhat like K-Pop too as well, though that of a far less degree. If only some people would listen to music other than the ones often heard in the radio stations or in videos or in games, they wouldn't really be missing out on what several overlooked, but extremely talented artists would be sending out today. It's just a shame how these artists who spill their love for music never get the true recognition they so humbly and righteously deserve.

nicely detailed post you have here lol..I really don't think kpop and jpop are very similar...but then it depends on songs i guess ...I don't quite agree with the orthodoxal part either. It is true that kpop is popular for their ballads and classicals (I guess you refer to the OST type music in the winter sonata like dramas)....but you also have to remember that there is also a strong emphasis on R&B as well with artists like Fly to the Sky and Se7en. Do also remember that the early H.O.T and S.E.S style songs were based more on pop than anything else. Shinhwa's early albums included songs with likes of "all your dream" and "yo" and i would hardly categorise these as either ballad or classical.

In terms of korean artists sliding into the japanese market....its pretty well marked that japan has the biggest music industry in asia and you are right in saying it is a stepping stone onto the world stage. There are a lot of artists that haven't cemented themselves well in the korean music industry and have failed miserably when trying to break into the japanese market (Jewelry). But artists that have done well in the korean music industry (in particular males artists and groups) have had a reasonable following in japan even if they are not overly well known (Shinhwa, Bi (Rain), Se7en, DBSK).

Korean female artists have not done that well either compared to their japanese counterparts. When you talk about kpop only BoA stands out...but there have been groups in the past that have stood out such as Baby VOX, FinKL, SES...and they did have talent but too bad they split and their individual careers aren't as great...just a bit lacking in depth nowadayz...but if you look at japanese female groups there are a lot of young female groups that how do I say it....have a rather large otaku like fan following...look at groups like BerryZ kubou, Morning Musume (are they 8th generation now?)....well then again anyhting related to Hello Project has this type of following...AKB48, SweetS, DREAM, Hinoi Team...yup u name it...similar type fan base...and I guess this results in a lot of the sales...not saying they don't have talent because I am a fan of Momu (older generation tho...lol)....Im pretty sad about wot happended to W tho...I thoguht their music was cute. But yea I guess everything you've said about jpop is pretty spot on with the guys....one thing I think jpop stand out more than kpop is their mixed groups such as ELT and I really like their eurodance remixes.

I don't really think kpop is on the rise...I actually think kpop peaked around 2000-2002/3? when there was actually a lot of good groups coming through compared to now with only BoA, DBSK and super junior being big for SM....also a lot of artists these days are also jumping into acting as well because it is harder to make a living as a singer....but then again I guess that's no different from jpop with the KAT-TUN and NewS boys being in basically every school drama...lol.

I have been a long fan of both JPOP and KPOP...and I have to agree that JPOP is better in the females but KPOP is better in males....but then again it depends on the type of music you like.

  • Aug 06, 2006
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I don't know.....I'm not really sure how to tell differen't music apart, but pop relaly rocks~!

That "Korean Wave" is seriously.....omg.....including dramas and movies. All kinds of Korean celebrities are being appreciated around Asia. I'm so proud!

K-pop boost up ever since BoA, though. She started being active in Japan and China, and I guess that's how SM got into it.

People like Bi (Rain) and Se7en are really talented, too. I don't know if there's anyone else in those companies who are like that, though. I don't know...for now, I think SM is the big player in the Korean Wave music.

Guys do tend to have the better side in music, though. That's why you can have Super Junior, but not groupds like i-13 (made one cd and has been inactive for a year) and Super Girls (debuting in March).

  • Dec 14, 2006

kouzen

kouzen

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the one and only korean team/singer that i like is TVXQ (dong bang shin ki)..it's also the one and only team i like in the world..well..not icluding the anime songs..


  • Dec 22, 2006
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personally i like kpop more than jpop. i only joined this this because i thought it just focused on TVXQ. i realized a lot of jpop artists are korean. korean singers/groups want to expand their music with the rest of the world and since japan gets a lot of attention, they go there.

  • Dec 31, 2006
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I really love k-pop since I heard the song "Tri-Angle" from TVXQ!*___*
I can't believe that many good j-pop artists are korean - for example BoA.I didn't know she was korean and now I like her korean songs much more...

  • Jun 15, 2007
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wow! really good stuff and info you have there^^. i agree with you that j-pop is alot more popluar than k-pop...why? because of the whole culture thing...jap, has games and music and all those radical fashions...i dont dont anything about korean culture thast why. but i like kpop more so than kpop because its more like dance genre. when they speak its more fluent than japanese music , i heard too many to know the difference b/c im a fan of both^^

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I think that K-Pop and K-Rock are similar to J-Pop and J-Rock. I haven't heard lots of korean songs but i heard some of them in one korean movie which name i can't translate...

myri-chan

myri-chan

Mare-shal Of Ye Ataponist Maquis

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In my opinion, J-pop has great techno,rock,fusion bands but k-Pop has very good electro/hiphop/rnb music and korean idols are more mature in comparison.

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