life after death?

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have you ever wondered where will you go after death?

  • Dec 26, 2006

norine07

norine07

???? ???...

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hahax..! i wish to never die though hahax..! but heaven of course.. ^^

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Kazakian

Memetic Legacy

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I would like to think i would go to heaven ^^ that's because i consider myself one of the good guys :D.

  • Dec 30, 2006

starfixxxer

starfixxxer

Vengeance

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I'll get recycled of course :P

"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free."

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I'd rather be reincarnated..... like what starfixxxer said XD

  • Jan 05, 2007
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Reincarnated and live another scenario of yours. What a boring thing. Why u not prepare to go to heaven that God promised land for man with wisedom.

  • Jan 18, 2007

crsg

crsg

Artemis

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I believe in human reincarnation (that is, I don't believe that I'll be reincarnated into an animal).

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What you felt, heard, thought and done before to be born will be the same thing you will feel, hear, think after life...

  • Jan 18, 2007

ProgramZERO

ProgramZERO

The Lost Generation

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Quote by athrun-yumehave you ever wondered where will you go after death?

All the time... Hold on, let me go find out... *Kills self* x_x

Sleeping peacefully on the edges of No Man's Land... Not all good is rewarded, not all evil is punished.

DarkIngram

DarkIngram

Urzu 7

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There's no life after death...

The dead are shown to be "conscious of nothing at all" and the death state to be one of complete inactivity. (Ecclesiastes 9:5, 10; Psalm 146:4) Those dying are described as going into "the dust of death" (Psalm 22:15), becoming "impotent in death." (Provebs 2:18; Isaiah 26:14) In death there is no mention of God or any praising of him. (Psalm 6:5; Isaia 38:18, 19) In both the Hebrew and the Greek Scriptures, death is likened to sleep, a fitting comparison not only because of the unconscious condition of the dead but also because of the hope of an awakening through the resurrection. (Psalm 13:3; John 11:11-14)

ProgramZERO

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The Lost Generation

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Quote by DarkIngramThere's no life after death...

The dead are shown to be "conscious of nothing at all" and the death state to be one of complete inactivity. (Ecclesiastes 9:5, 10; Psalm 146:4) Those dying are described as going into "the dust of death" (Psalm 22:15), becoming "impotent in death." (Provebs 2:18; Isaiah 26:14) In death there is no mention of God or any praising of him. (Psalm 6:5; Isaia 38:18, 19) In both the Hebrew and the Greek Scriptures, death is likened to sleep, a fitting comparison not only because of the unconscious condition of the dead but also because of the hope of an awakening through the resurrection. (Psalm 13:3; John 11:11-14)

? DarkIngram, aren't you Christian?

Sleeping peacefully on the edges of No Man's Land... Not all good is rewarded, not all evil is punished.

Persocom01

Persocom01

Seeker of the Truth

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Quote by ProgramZERO? DarkIngram, aren't you Christian?

He's more specifically of the Jehovah's Witness faction of Christianity. Around 33% of the world is "Christian" but the term Christian is actually pretty broad, (due to the impossibility of identifying the "true" form of Christianity) and some factions have very different beliefs.

I'm a Methodist and I do think that there is life after death.

"There was a certain rich man who was customarily clothed in purple and fine linen and making merry in luxury every day. And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, who was laid at his gate, full of sores and desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table. But even the dogs came and licked his sores. And it happened that the beggar died and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom. The rich one also died and was buried. And in hell he lifted up his eyes, being in torments, and saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom." - Luke 16:19-23

  • Jan 20, 2007
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Quote by starfixxxerI'll get recycled of course :P

my family's buddhist, but i'm atheist. but i do believe in reincarnation. history does repeat, the seasons, day and night. its natural and the circle of life. my god, my lord, my savior, is really a goddess. She's Mother Earth.

my parents say if you're virtueous in this life, you have a better life the next, and if you do even better, life after reincarnated if, you will one day be a free spirit, in nirvana, in enternal happiness.

but i don't really think one can really do that. i want to be reincarnated, because there's so many things you can do when you're alive good or bad. you can make the world better or worse, make it keep fighting, make the world keep living

  • Jan 20, 2007
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The life objective is to gain experiences, in order to become one again like it was at the beggining of the universe, where the one shattered himself to create the universe so he won't be alone, we are all the pieces that are left of the ONE, so if the only thing that we may be able to call god is death there can't possibly exist either heaven or hell, so all there is is an almost infinite number of lives until we become one agin.

  • Jan 20, 2007
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personaly, i believe we're reincarnated after we die. if you dont believe the same thing, then please don't bitch to me on how you believe i'm wrong =p

  • Jan 20, 2007

ProgramZERO

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The Lost Generation

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Quote by Persocom01

Quote by ProgramZERO? DarkIngram, aren't you Christian?

He's more specifically of the Jehovah's Witness faction of Christianity. Around 33% of the world is "Christian" but the term Christian is actually pretty broad, (due to the impossibility of identifying the "true" form of Christianity) and some factions have very different beliefs.

I'm a Methodist and I do think that there is life after death.

"There was a certain rich man who was customarily clothed in purple and fine linen and making merry in luxury every day. And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, who was laid at his gate, full of sores and desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table. But even the dogs came and licked his sores. And it happened that the beggar died and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom. The rich one also died and was buried. And in hell he lifted up his eyes, being in torments, and saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom." - Luke 16:19-23

But what's up with him claiming disbelief in an afterlife?

Sleeping peacefully on the edges of No Man's Land... Not all good is rewarded, not all evil is punished.

kokuyu

kokuyu

.:~Mugunghwa Traveler ~:.

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till now, no one has ever a concrete evidence of how does otherworld looks like. somehow, it's just a 'reward & punishment' statement in order to keep social in the right order.

in christian, jewish and islam belief, there's no re-incarnation. so, i wondered: what will happen in the next 1000 years if the past 1000 years' souls fill heaven? will it be very congested?
thus, came the reply: 're-incarnation' and 'resurrection'. in other words: recycled

i belief in neither of that. just do what i need to do (be good to others ;) ) and leave the world when the time comes. i'll join mother nature in giving my body to all organisms.
it's that wonderful to be part of nature? :)

-"Life is more than just one, & nothing's more important than One"-
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DarkIngram

DarkIngram

Urzu 7

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I'm a Christian... :)

Jehovah God did not create humans to go to heaven after they died. It was not his original purpose that they should die at all. Adam and Eve were created perfect and were given the opportunity to fill the earth with righteous offspring. (Genesis 1:28; Deuteronomy 32:4) Our first parents were told that they would die only if they disobeyed God. (Genesis 2:17) If they had remained obedient to their heavenly Father, they would have kept on living on earth forever...

Sadly, though, Adam and Eve failed to obey God. (Genesis 3:6, 7) The tragic consequences are described by the apostle Paul: "Through one man sin entered into the world and death through sin, and thus death spread to all men because they had all sinned." (Romans 5:12) Instead of living forever on earth, Adam and Eve died. What happened then? Did they have immortal souls that could now be consigned to a fiery hell because of their sin? On the contrary, the Bible says that earlier, when he was created, Adam "came to be a living soul." (Genesis 2:7) Man was not given a soul; he became a soul, a living person. (1 Corinthians 15:45) Why, not only was Adam "a living soul" but, as shown in the Hebrew language in which Genesis was written, the lower animals were "living souls" too! (Genesis 1:24) When Adam and Eve died, they became dead souls. Eventually, it happened to them just as Jehovah had said to Adam: "In the sweat of your face you will eat bread until you return to the ground, for out of it you were taken. For dust you are and to dust you will return." (Genesis 3:19)

"The soul that is sinning" it itself will die," not suffer in hellfire! (Ezekiel 18:4) While this is very different from what Christendom teaches, it is entirely consistent with what the wise man Solomon said under inspiration: "The living are conscious that they will die; but as for the dead, they are conscious of nothing at all, neither do they anymore have wages [in this life], because the remembrance of them has been forgotten. All that your hand finds to do, do with your very power, for there is no work nor devising nor knowledge nor wisdom in Sheol [mankind's common grave], the place to which you are going." (Ecclesiastes 9:5, 10)

Why does Christendom teach something so different from what the Bible says? The New Catholic Encyclopedia, in its article "Soul, Human, Immortality Of," says that early Church Fathers found support for belief in an immortal soul, not in the Bible, but in "the poets and philosophers and general tradition of Greek thought . . . Later, the scholastics preferred to make use of Plato or principles from Aristotle." It states that "the influence of Platonic and Neoplatonic thought"--including belief in the immortal soul--eventually was inserted "into the very core of Christian theology."

Should professed Christians have turned to pagan Greek philosophers to learn about something as basic as the hope of life after death? Of course not. When Paul wrote to Christians living in Corinth, Greece, he said: "The wisdom of this world is foolishness with God; for it is written: 'He catches the wise in their own cunning.' And again: 'Jehovah knows that the reasonings of the wise men are futile.'" (1 Corinthians 3:19, 20) The ancient Greeks were idol worshipers. How, then, could they be a source of truth? Paul asked the Corinthians: "What agreement does God's temple have with idols? For we are a temple of a living God; just as God said: 'I shall reside among them and walk among them, and I shall be their God, and they will be my people.'" (2 Corinthians 6:16)

Revelation of sacred truths was initially given through the nation of Israel. (Romans 3:1, 2) After 33 C.E., it was given through the first-century anointed Christian congregation. Paul, speaking of first-century Christians, said: "It is to us God has revealed [the things prepared for those who love him] through his spirit." (1 Corinthians 2:10; see also Revelation 1:1, 2.) Christendom's doctrine of the immortality of the soul is derived from Greek philosophy. It was not revealed through God's revelations to Israel or through the first-century congregation of anointed Christians...

If there is no immortal soul, what is the real hope for the dead? It is, of course, the resurrection, a central Bible doctrine and a truly wonderful divine promise. Jesus held out the resurrection hope when he said to his friend Martha: "I am the resurrection and the life. He that exercises faith in me, even though he dies, will come to life." (John 11:25) To believe in Jesus means to believe in the resurrection, not in an immortal soul...

Jesus had earlier spoken of the resurrection when he said to some Jews: "Do not marvel at this, because the hour is coming in which all those in the memorial tombs will hear his voice and come out." (John 5:28, 29) What Jesus here describes is very different from an immortal soul surviving the death of the body and going straight to heaven. It is a future 'coming out' of people who have been in the grave, many for centuries or even for thousands of years. It is dead souls coming back to life. Impossible? Not to the God "who makes the dead alive and calls the things that are not as though they were." (Romans 4:17) Skeptics may mock at the idea of people coming back from the dead, but it harmonizes perfectly with the fact that "God is love" and that he is "the rewarder of those earnestly seeking him." (1 John 4:16; Hebrews 11:6)

After all, how could God reward those who proved to be "faithful even to death" if he did not bring them back to life? (Revelation 2:10) The resurrection also makes it possible for God to accomplish what the apostle John wrote about: "For this purpose the Son of God was made manifest, namely, to break up the works of the Devil." (1 John 3:8) Back in the garden of Eden, Satan became the murderer of the whole human race when he led our first parents into sin and death. (Genesis 3:1-6; John 8:44) Jesus began to break up Satan's works when he gave his perfect life as a corresponding ransom, opening the way for mankind to be released from the inherited slavery to sin resulting from Adam's willful disobedience. (Romans 5:18) The resurrection of those who die because of this Adamic sin will be a further breaking up of the Devil's works...

When the apostle Paul was in Athens, he preached the good news to a crowd that included some Greek philosophers. They listened to his discussion about the one true God and his call to repentance. But what happened next? Paul concluded his speech, saying: "[God] has set a day in which he purposes to judge the inhabited earth in righteousness by a man whom he has appointed, and he has furnished a guarantee to all men in that he has resurrected him from the dead." Those words caused a stir. "When they heard of a resurrection of the dead, some began to mock." (Acts 17:22-32) Theologian Oscar Cullmann observes: "For the Greeks who believed in the immortality of the soul it may have been harder to accept the Christian preaching of the resurrection than it was for others. . . . The teaching of the great philosophers Socrates and Plato can in no way be brought into consonance [agreement] with that of the New Testament."

Even so, following the great apostasy after the death of the apostles, theologians labored to merge the Christian teaching of the resurrection with Plato's belief in the immortal soul. In time, some agreed on a novel solution: At death, the soul is separated ("liberated," as some put it) from the body. Then, according to Outlines of the Doctrine of the Resurrection, by R. J. Cooke, on Judgment Day "each body shall be again united to its own soul, and each soul to its own body." The future reuniting of the body with its immortal soul is said to be the resurrection...

This theory is still the official doctrine of mainstream churches. While such a notion may seem logical to a theologian, most churchgoers are unacquainted with it. They simply believe that they will go straight to heaven when they die. For this reason, in the May 5, 1995, issue of Commonweal, writer John Garvey charged: "The belief of most Christians [on the matter of life after death] seems to be much closer to Neoplatonism than to anything truly Christian, and it has no biblical basis." Indeed, by trading the Bible for Plato, Christendom's clergy extinguished the Biblical resurrection hope for their flocks...

On the other hand, Jehovah's Witnesses reject pagan philosophy and adhere to the Bible's teaching of the resurrection. They find such teaching to be edifying, satisfying, and comforting...

Gallopia

Gallopia

__DaRK_ HImE__

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after my life when i am dead ....
Hmmm.... i think i will turn into a werid thing ... >.<

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Gallopia copy rights! DaRK HiME has return....

  • Jan 22, 2007
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Raise your hand if you bother reading any of the essays posted in these simple question threads.

I dont believe in any life after death. As all other organisms, we die, and fuel future life with our um, material. Thats it. But if there was a word Id like death to be, its peaceful.

  • Jan 22, 2007

kokuyu

kokuyu

.:~Mugunghwa Traveler ~:.

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Quote by daftvaderRaise your hand if you bother reading any of the essays posted in these simple question threads.

I dont believe in any life after death. As all other organisms, we die, and fuel future life with our um, material. Thats it. But if there was a word Id like death to be, its peaceful.


*raises up high* it's me who've heard your call :)

i'll just quote back what i've just said, as a backing to your statement:

Quote by kokuyu till now, no one has ever a concrete evidence of how does otherworld looks like. somehow, it's just a 'reward & punishment' statement in order to keep social in the right order.

in christian, jewish and islam belief, there's no re-incarnation. so, i wondered: what will happen in the next 1000 years if the past 1000 years' souls fill heaven? will it be very congested?
thus, came the reply: 're-incarnation' and 'resurrection'. in other words: recycled

i belief in neither of that. just do what i need to do (be good to others ;) ) and leave the world when the time comes. i'll join mother nature in giving my body to all organisms.
it's that wonderful to be part of nature? :)

-"Life is more than just one, & nothing's more important than One"-
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DarkIngram

DarkIngram

Urzu 7

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Quote by Persocom01

Quote by ProgramZERO? DarkIngram, aren't you Christian?

He's more specifically of the Jehovah's Witness faction of Christianity. Around 33% of the world is "Christian" but the term Christian is actually pretty broad, (due to the impossibility of identifying the "true" form of Christianity) and some factions have very different beliefs.

I'm a Methodist and I do think that there is life after death.

"There was a certain rich man who was customarily clothed in purple and fine linen and making merry in luxury every day. And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, who was laid at his gate, full of sores and desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table. But even the dogs came and licked his sores. And it happened that the beggar died and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom. The rich one also died and was buried. And in hell he lifted up his eyes, being in torments, and saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom." - Luke 16:19-23

Since we cannot escape the conclusion that Jesus' words regarding the rich man and Lazarus are an illustration, what do they illustrate, what is their meaning? In brief they tell of the change in the relative positions of two classes of people due to the preaching of the truth, both in Jesus' day and in ours...

The rich man well pictures the Jewish clergy who were well provided for with spiritual provision; who considered themselves children of the kingdom, clothed in purple; who were very self-righteous, wearing fine linen; and who were proud of being Abraham's offspring. (Romans 3:1, 2; Matthew 8:12; 23:27, 28; Revelation 19:8; Matthew 3:9)

The beggar Lazarus, whose name means "God is helper," well pictures the Jewish common people, who were despised by the clergy, who because of neglect were spiritually sick and were hungering and thirsting for righteousness, and who appreciated their need of the Great Physician, Christ Jesus. (John 7:49; Matthew 5:6; Mark 2:17)

The death of the rich man and of Lazarus pictured a change taking place in the relative positions of these two classes. That this should be so should not surprise us, for time and again the Scriptures speak of persons as dying or having died though still alive, meaning thereby that a change has taken place in their lives. (See 1 Corinthians 11:30; Colossians 3:3; 1 Timothy 5:6; Jude 12.) The preaching by Jesus that exposed the hypocrisy, greed and false teaching of the Jewish clergy caused a change to take place in their lives. (Matthew 23; Luke 16:14; Matthew 15:1-9) From a state of self-satisfied and luxurious ease they were brought into a state of torment; such torment that they had no peace until they had put the Son of God to death. (Matthew 21:45, 46)

Those pictured by Lazarus, the Jewish common people of faith toward God, likewise experienced a change in their condition due to the preaching of Jesus, to become the spiritual remnant of Jewry. Even as their name "Lazarus" indicates, they were helped, comforted of God and given the hope of God's heavenly kingdom. Yes, the poor and spiritually sick harlots and tax collectors were entering the kingdom of God and were receiving God's favor, as pictured by reclining upon Abraham's bosom. The heavy burdens the Pharisees had placed upon them were being removed, and they became themselves part of the "seed of Abraham" in whom all the families of the earth are to bless themselves. (Matthew 11:6; 21:31; Galatians 3:7, 26; Matthew 23:4; 11:28-30)

And the great chasm between the two classes? This pictures Jehovah's righteous judgments, which cannot be changed. The religious leaders as a class had fixed their destiny by sinning against the holy spirit, for which there is no forgiveness; and their plea to have their torment eased, even in the slightest, by diminishing the preaching of the truth, was not to be complied with. (Mark 3:29; Acts 5:27-32)

The five brothers of the rich man well picture the associates of the Jewish clergy who manifested the same spirit as the Pharisees. These, refusing to believe in Jesus, showed thereby that they actually were not taking heed to what Moses and the Prophets had said. And that they would not believe even if one rose from the dead was borne out when Lazarus, the brother of Mary and Martha, did actually rise from the dead. (John 7:47, 48; 5:46, 47; 12:10, 11)

kokuyu

kokuyu

.:~Mugunghwa Traveler ~:.

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Quote by crsgI believe in human reincarnation (that is, I don't believe that I'll be reincarnated into an animal).


if you believe in human reincarnation, that will depend how good the things you've done in mortal world. in Hinduism and Buddhism beliefs, if your sin outweigh good deeds, then you're destined to reincarnate into an animal. that's the punishment in reincarnation.
are you a Buddhist too, crsg?

-"Life is more than just one, & nothing's more important than One"-
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Zyndarius

Zyndarius

Sage of the Five Paths

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Yes, of course. And I am also pretty sure it is. Why? One has to be very very narrow minded to believe that the only plane that exists is the material prime. I am not enteirng in details xD.

"Every spilled tear, feeds the roots, of a tree which the heavens will reach."

  • Jan 24, 2007

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